The Libertarianism.UK Podcast: Sean Gabb — The State of UK Politics

In our inaugural Libertarianism.UK Podcast, I discuss with the illustrious Sean Gabb the current state of UK politics.

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Timecodes
0:00 – Intro
1:10 – Heating Bills in the UK
2:12 – Who is Sean Gabb?
2:50 – The General State of UK Politics
4:24 – From Margaret Thatcher to Boris Johnson
10:07 – Can a New Party of the Right be Created?
15:50 – Secession in the UK
21:26 – Totalitarianism in the UK?
24:20 – What About Brexit?
27:20 – Nigel Farage
29:41 – How Can Things be Improved?
34:15 – Richard Blake et al

You can find out more about Sean Gabb, here:

You can find out more about the Centre for Ancient Studies, here:

Some quotes from the podcast:

  • “Come the next election, we have a choice. We can vote Labour and get the Leftists we voted for or we can vote Conservative for the Leftists we didn’t vote for.”
  • “All of the bad things that have happened in this country over the past few generations really started with the election of Margaret Thatcher.”
  • “You think to yourself, England is still around me. England hasn’t been destroyed. It can’t be destroyed. It will triumph. But it’s not true.”
  • “You can talk about the organic linkage and development of our constitution and our national ways, but in general I’m afraid the nation has been atomised into a mass of terrified and obedient sheep.”
  • “As a classics teacher, in which I do some limited good, I do the limited good that I can to hand on our civilisation to another generation, and that’s as much as I can do.”
  • “There is no revolutionary class in this country. And in the absence of that, the most that we can hope for is that there will this time be a successful revolution in America, and fresh orders will be sent out from the new people in Washington to their satellites in London. And we might see some improvement because of that, but I do not see any spontaneous reform in this country.”
  • “We are already closer to totalitarianism than supposedly Communist China.”
  • “[On Brexit] the idea is to wait until enough of the leavers have died out or until lavish grants of citizenship have produced a new majority, then announce that circumstances have changed and run a rigged referendum and take us back in. They may not take us formally into the European Union and there will be some very creative new membership agreement. But I think the ruling class in this country was rather surprised and frightened when the referendum went the wrong way for their view of things. First of all, they tried to stop it by just refusing to go through with the will of the people. And then they had to go through some form of the will of the people. But it’s just part of this holding operation, to keep things ticking over until the whole thing can be reconstituted.”
  • “I have a great deal of respect for Nigel Farage as an individual and he is the man who got us as far as we’ve got in leaving the European Union. I think the problem with his party is that it is filled with the usual Tory boys.”
  • “Conservatives talk about freedom. They talk about free markets. They talk about tradition. And they have been in power now for twelve years and we’re living in a Leftist, totalitarian police state which is growing progressively worse.”
  • “The only thing that we can do is to form ourselves into libertarian communities. Now that sounds rather utopian and vague, but what I mean is this: if you need an accountant, you go to someone who shares your personal political opinions. If you want to take legal action or if you want someone to paint your house or clean your windows or re-plaster your walls, you should make sure to give your preference to people who broadly share your outlook on life.”

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One comment


  1. You are two respectable, productive, law-abiding gentleman having a nice, pleasant, reasonable discussion. You are the type of people who sustain Western (i.e. white) civilisation. You are NOT the type of people to save it. I mean this in the nicest possible way: you’re useless.

    The type of people to save it are the opposite of the two of you. Not ‘chavs’ or ‘thugs’ exactly, as organisational nous and a level of discipline, restraint and intelligence are needed, but certainly people who are not respectable and not law abiding in the sense you two are. The type of people who would draw an intake a breath in your social company.

    I think this is partly the problem: we are now in an advanced technical bourgeois civilisation, perhaps at its height (or even past its height), and have come to the end of the road. We’re genetically spent. As Orwell remarked, where are the moustachioed men with their barrel chests? The Byronic Man, where is he? We need him because the New Class (or whatever you want to call them) have to be killed or have to genuinely fear they could be killed or maimed, or both. It’s not a nice thing to say and I don’t really want to say it, but there isn’t a democratic solution to it. Surely you can see that. I don’t expect you to voice agreement with me here, as it’s too dangerous for you, but you can surely recognise this.

    That’s not to say electoral politics is useless to reactionary people. My personal view is that local politics would be of some use as a platform for civic action, and as a foundation for national politics – but this requires people who are determined, clever and have the patience, time and sources to pursue a long-term strategy. The BNP ultimately failed because its leadership failed to put in place competent people in local government roles. These ‘competent people’ need not be, and probably should not be, ‘true believers’. They should just be ordinary people of average IQ with a conservative or traditional bent, but reliable, competent and diligent in those roles, able to sit in council chambers year after year discussing waste management strategies and quietly blocking certain things.

    Of course, in all of this, we are not exactly on the same side. To me, liberalism/libertarianism (and its prototype forms) is something that English people do when they can organise their own societies. We don’t have that luxury. In our situation, liberalism is just another suicidal philosophy. Organising into dispersed communities is a good practical idea, but it won’t change anything.

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